Scent of a Gamer

From the computer to the tabletop, this is all about games. Updated each week-end.

SAGA faction review: Scots

The SAGA Age of Vikings book presents 12 very different factions to players. This series will review each one in turn.

Who were they?

The Scots were the Irish-descended inhabitants of Scotland, who eventually took over sole rule of the lands from the Picts, apparently after inviting all the Pictish kings to a big feast and then murdering them all. So they say.

A unified Scotland still suffered under attacks from Vikings, English, Normans and more. It would be long after the Viking Age ended that Scotland assumed its borders of today, but that’s another story.

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Options

Scots Hearthguard and Warlords may be mounted, while Levy units have the option of javelin or bow. Warriors have no options.

Two legendary characters are available; Kenneth MacAlpine and MacBeth. MacAlpine gives all nearby friendly units bonus attack dice, as well as forcing one enemy unit to begin the game with a fatigue counter, due to some free wine delivered on the eve of battle.

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MacBeth lets you roll a consistent 6 SAGA dice per turn, regardless of how many (or how few!) you might normally generate. He also gives you access to a unit of Norman horse, who gain additional attack dice if they charge into combat.

Battle Board

The Scots Battle Board requires close reading and good planning to use well. The Tireless ability removes a fatigue marker from a unit which closed ranks in the previous melee, while Counter-Attack gives you 2 attack dice for every defence dice you have.

Using your Battle Board abilities at the right time is critical as they can be the difference between holding your ground in combat and inflicting a crushing defeat on your foe!

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Summary

The Scots are not a simple force to use, and I would not recommend them for starting players. However their Battle Board and play style give you a glimpse how how deep the play styles can get when SAGA dives into the complexity pool.

Information

This entry was posted on September 2, 2018 by in Review and tagged , , , , .
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